Posts Tagged ‘antioxidants’

Health and Wellness With a Cherry on Top – The New Superfruit

Before a workout

Runner who drank a glass twice a day for a week before a strenuous race had significally less muscle soreness afterward than those who drank a placebo juice. Previous research has suggested that drinking cherry juice helps muscles recover better from a strength-training workout.

Before Bed

A new study in the European Journal of Nutrition found that adults who had two daily glasses of tart cherry juice slept 39 minutes longer, on average, and spent significantly less time awake in bed compared to those who drank a non-cherry based fruit cocktail. For better zzz’z, researchers advise having a glass 30 minutes to an hour before bedtime.

Any OMG time

Cherries and their juice are a rich souce of powerful class of antioxidants called anthocyanins, “Studies suggest that eating cherries has the potential to lower heart disease risk.

Tantalizing and Green with Envy Tamanu Oil

The tamanu nut-tree comes form the plant species Calopyllum inophyllm, which s commonly found along the shores of Southeast Asia, and grows to approximately three meters in length. Calopyllum means, “beautiful leaf” in Greek and the Polynesians tamanu is their tamanu is their “green gold” known for safely and effectively regenerating damaged skin.  Beautiful, fragrant, orange blossom like flowers bloom on the tamanu twice a year, and produce 100 kilograms of apricot sized fruit annually, translating to 5 kg of mature nut oil, which is deep green in color and carries a luxuriously pleasant aroma.

Tamanu, also known as kamani among Hawaiians, has historically been used as a topical agent for th relief of pain from sciatica,, shingles, neuraligia, rheumatism and many other skin issues, including burns, scrapes, insect bites, sores and blisters. Its use has been very popular among the Southeast Asian natives in Thailand, Vietnam and Sri Lanka. Historically, one of the most highly regarded medical studies involved a woman who was admitted to St. Louis Hospital in Paris with a large, gangrenous ulcer on her leg that was not healing properly. Amputation seemed unavoidable, yet the doctors opted instead to administer tamanu oil dressings to her leg on a regular basis in the hopes that the wound would heal. Eventually, the consistent application of the oil to the woman’s leg resulted in the limb’s complete recovery. After some time passed, all that remained of the wound was a smooth flat scar. This remarkable incident that occurred years ago kicked off years of research of tamanu oil’s therapeutic and healing effects for the skin.

Although tamanu oil has proven to be effective in addressing a broad range of skin problems – the oil is found to be quite soothing, even on sensitive skin. According to Plant Resources of Tropical Africa and Chris Kilham, an ethnobotanist who researches and studies the effects of plant-based medicines, this cold pressed oil contains anti-inflammatory properties. This is due to the presence of 4-phenyl coumarin calophylloide and a group of xanthones, which explains the reduction effect it has on rashes, sores, swelling and various skin abrasions. The antimicrobial phytochemical agents like friedelin, canophyllol, canophyllic acid and inophynone are the reason for the oil’s efficacy against various human and animal pathogens, including Staphylococcus and other undesirable infections.

According to reports from research conducted in Pakistan, friedelin, one of tamanu’s antimicrobial agents, exhibited activity against various fungal diseases found in hair, skin and nails.  The presence of antioxidants that all of us look for in a skin care regimen is abundant properties, specifically inhibiting lipid peroxidation (oxidative degradation of lipids). We must not forget that our cell membranes, including those of skin cells, are made up of lipids. The presence of these compounds allow tamanu oil the capacity to promote the formation of new tissue, thereby accelerating cicatrization, increasing skin’s elasticity and suppleness, minimizing blemishes and reducing common free radicals.

The tamanu tree is a valuable element for skin protection and an effective remedy for many skin problems and health conditions. It can be credited for the beautiful, blemish free skin of Polynesian women. The substantial research that has been conducted on the tamanu tree has continuously uncovered positive data on its beneficial properties. It is time we recognized tamanu as the precious gift of nature that it truly is.

Check out some of the products we use that contan Tamanu Oil…experience  the “green gold” of beauty.

~Source: LNE

New Berry in Town – Lingonberry the Disease Fighter

The benefits of the berry are starting to seem endless. Blueberries have been shown to be helpful with protecting blood vessels in diabetics. Cranberries have been used for years to effectively treat urinary tract infections. And raspberries have eye-protective antioxidants called lutein. Eating berries in general may also help ward off certain types of cancers.

Berries are an amazing group of fruits. The berry came up with an amazing assortment of plant chemicals called polyphenols, which are powerful antioxidants, to help neutralize the sun’s radiation to avoid damage to its tender flesh. A type of polyphenol called flavonoids give berries their dark coloring and confer health benefits on uswhen we eat them.

One of new berries on the block that science is seriously looking into is the lingonberry; it appears to have higher concentrations of plant polyphenols and may confer even greater health benefits. Well known in Scandinavia, the lingonberry’s Latin name is vaccinium vitis-idaea, and is also known as the cowberry. As a member of the vaccinium species, it is related to the cranberry, bilberry and blueberry. Today, scientists are showing its value in both human and animal studies that are proving to have positive results.

  • Animal studies have shown how the lingonberry can lower inflammatory molecules, block oxidants from destroying tissue, and also help the body replace important antioxidants, like glutathione, which is a master antioxidant in our body.
  •  Lingonberry has also been shown to increase red blood cell and liver enzymes needed for antioxidant protection. We need antioxidants to protect vessels and nerve tissue, and also to help decrease the damage from inflammation
  • Native Americans in North America have a history of using this berry to help those suffering with diabetes and cardiovascular illness
  •  A  2010 Canadian study with First Nation Cree subjects found that the lingonberry was able to reduce the effect of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). AGEs are the byproduct of sugars and heated protein molecules in the body that accumulate in patients with high blood sugar. These AGEs contribute to the damage in a diabetic’s vessels. This damage is a major contributor to kidney disease, eye disease and circulation problems that can lead to skin sores and amputation.
  • Naturopathic treatments for diabetes include exercise, eating low glycemic index foods (low sugar content) that are cooked at low temperatures and are minimally processed, and blood-sugar-balancing herbs like gymnema and cinnamon. Now, it seems we can add lingonberry to this list.

Although not well known in the United States, lingonberries are available in juice form in some health food stores. They can also be found in jams, and the berries can be bought frozen or in powdered form online. Those with diabetes, blood pressure challenges, and inflammatory concerns, here is a quick recipe (make sure to consult with your physician first) a tablespoon or two of the frozen berries and adding them to one cup of non-sweetened almond milk with a three-quarter cup of ice; blend for a healthy flavonoid-rich treat!

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